Classroom Multiplication Games

I love using classroom multiplication games to reinforce times table facts. Any way that you can find to reinforce multiplication facts in a fun way is ideal for helping your students learn their times tables. Here are four of my favorite classroom multiplication games.

classroom multiplication games pencil in front of worksheet

Around the World

One student stand up and is ‘on’. They stand behind the student next to them (who remains seated in their chair). The teacher calls out a multiplication question for the student who is on and the seated student they are standing behind. If the standing student calls the answer out correctly first, they then move to stand behind the next student’s chair for the next question and so on, working their way around the other students in the class. However, if the seated student calls the correct answer out first, they are ‘on’ and they stand up and move to stand behind the next person’s chair for the next question and the standing student takes their seat. My students get super competitive and love to see how long they can be ‘on’ for.

Fizz Buzz

A classic! Choose two times table, i.e. 3x and 5x. Students sit in a circle and take turns to count from 1 to 50 (for example). However, on every multiple of 3, the student must say ‘Fizz’ instead of the number and on every multiple of 5, the student must say ‘buzz’ instead of the number. For every number that is a multiple of both 3 and 5, the student must say ‘Fizz Buzz!’.

Times Table Scavenger Hunt

On a piece of card, write a multiplication question. On another piece of card, write the answer as well as the next multiplication question. Continue until you have around 20-25 cards. Write the answer to question on the final card on the first card, so cards form a continuous loop. Place the cards around a large area  – outside is ideal for this. Students work in small groups of around 2 or 3. They work through the cards, solving the question and searching for the card with the next answer. Students write down the answers in order on a piece of paper. Assign different groups different starting cards, to stagger the movement around the cards.

Multiplication Bingo

Choose a times table, for example, the 3x table. Students choose 5 multiples of 3 (up to 12x 3) and write them on their mini whiteboards. The teacher calls out 3x multiplication questions from 1×3 through to 12×3. Students work out the answer and if they have the answer on their card they can cover with a counter or mark off with their pen. Continue calling the questions from the cards and students continue marking off the answers they have. When a student has all five numbers marked off, they shout out ‘BINGO’. If more than one student calls BINGO, the first student to call it wins! You can grab my Multiplication Bingo Cards here to play whole class bingo with.

classroom multiplication games bingo cards

They contain bingo cards for times table from the 2x through to 12x tables and includes 40 bingo cards per set – enough for each student in the class!

 

Morning Work

How do your students come into school in the mornings? Do they line up outside and come in together or do you have a window of time where they are able to come in? My class can come in any time between 8.45 and 9.00. This gives me a 15 minute period where my classroom slowly fills up. This makes it impossible to teach any sort of lesson with this staggered entry so it is important that I have something ready that is meaningful and my students can just get on with that requires no instruction from myself as I am taking lunch money and registering the students during this time. So with this in mind, I created my Times Table Daily Practise Sheets.

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I test the students every Friday on their tables. If they get 10 or more out of 12, I move them onto the next table. If not, I keep them on the same table for the following week as they are not yet secure in that multiplication table and need further practice. On a Monday I set out the sheets in the students’ places. As the students walk in they begin straight away by filling in Monday’s column. They do this every day of the week until the test on Friday when I review whether the student is ready to move on to a different table or needs further practice the next week on the same times table. My morning work routines ensures that the students know exactly what is expected of them as they enter the classroom and ensures a calm start to the day. It also provides an opportunity for differentiated multiplication fact review. How do you ensure a smooth start to the day and what do you use for morning work? I’d love to hear your ideas!